Tag Archives: WhiteboardWalls

WHITEBOARD WALLS BOOST CHILDREN’S CREATIVITY AND ENGAGEMENT

Because whiteboard walls are by nature large, multi-purpose, easy to use, and completely open-ended, they have immense potential for stimulating children’s innate creativity and engagement in homeschool learning. For this reason, they quickly become popular teaching resources for homeschooling parents, who encourage youngsters to use the walls to release their imaginations in independent or collaborative school work and recreational activities.

There’s a great deal that a top-quality open-ended teaching medium like a whiteboard wall can offer to foster free-thinking and inventiveness in young people’s minds. Due to their large, inviting surfaces and unlimited potential uses, children feel inspired to return to whiteboard walls again and again during the school day to doodle, create spontaneous artworks, write poetry, and do other activities. This inspirational quality is not as common with writing and drawing surfaces like notebook paper, flip charts, and traditional whiteboards, whose size limitations restrict the rapid flow of ideas and images coming from children’s minds, thus making these media less exciting to use.

Doodling and drawing on whiteboard walls enhance learning

Drawing on the vast open-ended canvas of a whiteboard wall, even when using a simple technique like doodling, triggers insights and discoveries that aren’t as likely to emerge with note pads, flip charts, or other small surfaces. When children draw an object or just randomly doodle, their minds become deeply attentive and focused. And it is this high level of attention that allows youngsters to become fully conscious of what they’re doing, which in turn helps them develop thinking skills that can be applied to schoolwork and to professional or business careers later in life.

This effect is amplified when children doodle or draw on a top-quality whiteboard-coated wall because studies show that using a large upright surface like a whiteboard wall greatly increases children’s creativity and engagement in school lessons. Working with dry erase markers on the vast open-ended canvas of a whiteboard wall is a lot more fun than writing and drawing using pencil and paper on a desk or tabletop with a limited amount of area to work on. Being horizontal surfaces, desks and tables also limit children’s use of their arm, hand, and back muscles, thus slowing the development of core strength, proper pencil grip, and other motor skills that children need to lead successful lives.

Drawing or doodling with a pencil or pen and paper is thus not only less exciting than working on a whiteboard wall but also less beneficial to children’s physical and mental development. For parents who want their homeschoolers to gain the most benefit for their bodies and brains while doing academic work, having them doodle, draw, and write on a whiteboard wall is an excellent option. And it is the element of fun that prompts young students to become more excited and engaged when working with a marker on a whiteboard wall than they would be working with pencil and paper.

Whiteboard walls make schoolwork more exciting

The freedom, expansiveness, and mobility of using a large area for school work make youngsters more interested in exploring new academic material and creative ideas. In addition, errors can be readily and cleanly erased from whiteboard walls, so there’s no need for kids to be concerned about leaving a messy smudged surface as they would when frequently erasing paper. In contrast to writing in a notebook or on a flip chart, writing with dry-erase markers on a whiteboard wall is more temporary and easily erased, and hence more able to stimulate the free flow of ideas. With a few quick swipes of a microfiber cloth, mistakes or unwanted writings will disappear so that new answers or thoughts can continue to be recorded until the correct solution or the best creative idea emerges.

Drawing, doodling, and writing on whiteboard walls reflects an age-old human tradition

Drawing, sketching, and doodling are time-honored human activities that help children to learn, free associate, and produce creative new ideas. Nowadays, the flood of branded blank sketchbooks, note pads, and journals on the market is helping to generate renewed interest in these pursuits. However, such paper-based materials have to be used while sitting near-horizontal surfaces such as tables, counters, or desks. And this position can hinder aspects of children’s psychomotor development by making them look down, hunch over, sit in a slouched posture, and limit their arm, wrist, and hand movements. By comparison, drawing or doodling on a whiteboard wall requires children to stand upright and use large sweeping motions to make images and write text, thus improving their skills in many important areas of physical and cognitive growth, including bilateral coordination, eye-hand coordination, and core strength.

It seems that the need to draw and doodle is hardwired into the human brain. In fact, among our early ancestors, the making of graphic markings on walls began long before the use of spoken language, as reflected in the world-famous prehistoric cave paintings at Lascaux in southern France. Thus, both random doodling and more methodical free-hand drawing have long been essential to human beings for conveying creative ideas and feelings.

The practice of writing on vertical surfaces like walls, called epigraphy, has also existed since time immemorial, with cases dating back to ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome. So, when children write, draw, or doodle on a whiteboard wall, they’re engaging in a natural human activity that goes back for millennia. Epigraphy serves different functions from writing on horizontal surfaces such as tables, counters, and desks or typing on computers or laptops because wall writing cultivates improved eye-hand coordination, visual attention, and other skills that children need for success in their studies and in daily life.

Whiteboard walls facilitate seeing “the big picture”

Also, on the broad expanse of a whiteboard-coated wall, children can view large writings or drawings at a single glance, thus making it easier for them to “get the big picture” when studying maps in geography, timelines in history, or graphic content in other subject areas. Thus, by far the most effective and engaging epigraphic medium for homeschool use is a large high-quality whiteboard-coated wall.

The vast, flexible, and limitless nature of premium whiteboard-coated walls allow them to constantly adapt and grow in step with the needs and skill levels of homeschoolers as they develop physically, academically, and creatively. Thus, both the instructional uses and productive potential of whiteboard walls are never-ending for both parents and children. As such, a whiteboard-coated wall in the homeschool environment can become a highly valued resource that inspires endless amounts of imaginative, engaged, and distinctive work and entertainment.

Creative Work Enhances Self Esteem and Family Bonding

Another significant point to note is that working creatively on a whiteboard wall in the homeschool setting can help to raise children’s self-esteem and improve the quality of family bonds. Expressing their creative images and ideas easily and freely on a whiteboard wall helps children feel good about themselves, and the ongoing encouragement of parents can help in this process. When given challenging art assignments that are appropriate for their level and that they can draw with a reasonable amount of effort, kids will be delighted at their accomplishments. The feat of successfully completing such creative tasks will encourage children to try even more challenging work in the future, and with a parent’s ongoing supervision and support, this can easily be accomplished.

Such activities reinforce the bond between parents and children because they have so many ideas to share that can easily be expressed on a whiteboard-coated wall. Grandparents may also be included in the idea-sharing. Whoever kids choose to interact in this way, working on whiteboard walls will definitely make their creative activities fun and help to improve family relations in the process.

Dry Erase Wall

Dry-Erase Wall Quotes for June 2021

June: The Beginning of Summer and a Time for New Growth

For many people, June is the most pleasurable month of the year. It signals the start of summer and brings sunny days, trips to the mountains, fun at the beach, and a host of other warm-weather activities. June is named after Juno, the ancient Roman goddess associated with spring, new growth, and women’s wellbeing. Juno was also the deity linked with marriage, so June is considered an auspicious month to tie the knot. Below is a collection of wise, perceptive, and sometimes humorous quotes about June for posting on your dry-erase painted wall. Let them provide you with a bit of inspiration while operating in your home office, classroom, business office, or other area, and offer you ideas for school writing assignments and the like.

The Positive Effects of Inspirational Dry-Erase Wall Quotes

Research has shown that such inspirational quotes have a positive impact on our emotions and attitudes. Since humans are generally optimistic by nature, we look for inspiration in the lives and ideas of positive role models, so uplifting quotes affect us on a basic psychological level. This is one reason that famous quotations and aphorisms are passed down from one generation to the next. Accordingly, to help preserve an upbeat attitude and provide yourself with a daily dose of motivation, you can regularly post these quotes on your dry-erase wall to inspire you in your work activities or help your homeschooled children learn better during the month of June. In this way, you might gain some positive food for thought, as well as a bit of humor and guidance to help you tackle daily tasks more successfully.

Upbeat Thoughts and Feelings about June to add to your Dry-Erase Wall.

1. “Far up in the deep blue sky, Great white clouds are floating by;/All the world is dressed in green;/Many happy birds are seen,/Roses bright and sunshine clear/Show that lovely June is here.”
– F. G. Sanders (Canadian poet)

2. “June is the time for being in the world in new ways, for throwing off the cold and dark spots of life.”
– Joan D. Chittister (US nun, theologian, author, and speaker)

3. June Mine is the Month of Roses; yes, and mine The Month of Marriages! All pleasant sights And scents, the fragrance of the blossoming vine, The foliage of the valleys and the heights. Mine are the longest days, the loveliest nights; The mower’s scythe makes music to my ear; I am the mother of all dear delights; I am the fairest daughter of the year.
– Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (US poet and educator)

4. “And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days.”
– James Russell Lowell (US romantic poet, critic, editor, and diplomat)

5. If a June night could talk, it would probably boast it invented romance.
– Bernard Williams (English moral philosopher)

6. What is one to say about June, the time of perfect young summer, the fulfillment of the promise of the earlier months, and with as yet no sign to remind one that its fresh young beauty will ever fade.
– Gertrude Jekyll (British horticulturist, garden designer, craftswoman, photographer, writer, and artist)

7. “Summer is a promissory note signed in June, its long days spent and gone before you know it, and due to be repaid next January.”
– Hal Borland (US author, journalist, and naturalist)

8. “Spring being a tough act to follow, God created June.
– Al Bernstein (US sportscaster, writer, stage performer, recording artist, and speaker)

9. “June is the gateway to summer.”
– Jean Hersey (US writer on nature and gardening)

10. “No price is set on the lavish summer; June may be had by the poorest comer.”
– James Russell Lowell (US romantic poet, critic, editor, and diplomat)

11. “To read a poem in January is as lovely as to go for a walk in June.”
– Jean Paul Sartre (French philosopher, novelist, screenwriter, playwright, biographer, and literary critic)

12. “And since all this loveliness cannot be Heaven, I know in my heart it is June.”
– Abba Woolson (19th-century US writer)

13. “I wonder what it would be like to live in a world where it was always June.”
– L. M. Montgomery (Canadian author)

14. “The castle grounds were gleaming in the sunlight as though freshly painted; the cloudless sky smiled at itself in the smoothly sparkling lake, the satin-green lawns rippled occasionally in a gentle breeze: June had arrived.”
– J.K. Rowling (British author, philanthropist, film producer, television producer, and screenwriter)

15. “June has never looked more beautiful than she does now, unadorned and honest, vulnerable yet invincible.”
– Marie Lu (US young adult author)

Dry-Erase Wall Quotes about Gardening and Nature in June

16. “In early June, the world of leaf and blade and flowers explodes, and every sunset is different.”
– John Steinbeck (renowned US author), The Winter of Our Discontent

17. “It is dry, hazy June weather. We are more of the earth, farther from heaven these days.”
– Henry David Thoreau (renowned US naturalist, essayist, poet, and philosopher)

18. “In June, as many as a dozen species may burst their buds on a single day. No man can heed all of these anniversaries; no man can ignore all of them.”
– Aldo Leopold (US author, philosopher, naturalist, scientist, ecologist, forester, conservationist, and environmentalist)

19. “June had drawn out every leaf on the trees.”
– Virginia Woolf (20th century English writer)

20. “June falls asleep upon her bier of flowers.”
– Lucy Larcom (US teacher, poet, and author)

21. “All June I bound the rose in sheaves. Now, rose by rose, I strip the leaves.”
– Robert Browning (English poet and playwright)

22. “Do not the bright June roses blow to meet thy kiss at morning hours?”
– William Cullen Bryant (US romantic poet, journalist, and newspaper editor)

23. “It is the month of June, the month of leaves and roses, when pleasant sights salute the eyes and pleasant scents the noses.”
– Nathaniel Parker Willis (US author, poet, and editor)

24. “On this June day, the buds in my garden are almost as enchanting as the open flowers. Things in bud bring, in the heat of a June noontide, the recollection of the loveliest days of the year, those days of May when all is suggested, nothing yet fulfilled.”
– Francis King (British novelist and short story writer)

25. “At midnight, in the month of June, I stand beneath the mystic moon.”
– Edgar Allan Poe (US writer, poet, editor, and literary critic)

26. “I know well that the June rains just fall.”
– Uejima Onitsura (Japanese haiku poet)

Additional Dry-Erase PaintednWall Quotes about June

27. “Summer is not obligatory. We can start an infernally hard jigsaw puzzle in June with the knowledge that, if there are enough rainy days, we may just finish it by Labor Day, but if not, there’s no harm, no penalty. We may have better things to do.”
– Nancy Gibbs (US essayist, speaker, and presidential historian)

28. “Green was the silence, wet was the light; the month of June trembled like a butterfly.”
– Pablo Neruda (Chilean poet-diplomat and politician)

29. “In my college years, I would retreat to our summer house for two weeks in June to read a novel a day. How exciting it was, after pouring my coffee and making myself comfortable on the porch, to open the next book on the roster, read the first sentences, and find myself on the platform of a train station.”
– Amor Towles (US novelist)

30. How did it get so late so soon? It’s night before it’s afternoon. December is here before its June. My goodness, how the time has flown! How did it get
so late so soon?
– Dr. Seuss (US children’s author, cartoonist, illustrator, poet, animator, and filmmaker)

31. “A cold in the head in June is an immoral thing.”
– L.M. Montgomery (Canadian author)

32. “It is June. I am tired of being brave.”
– Anne Sexton (US author)

Dry Erase Walls

PROPER SURFACE PREPARATION FOR A DRY ERASE PAINTED WALL

Your Wall Must Be Smooth

One of the most critical parts of achieving a successful dry-erase paint application is providing an absolutely smooth substrate beforehand. Make sure that your wall is as smooth as possible prior to starting your application. This is one of the sometimes overlooked aspects of properly prepping a surface to be covered with premium dry-erase coating. Any holes, cracks, or cuts on the wall must be filled in with spackling paste, otherwise known as spackling compound, a plaster-like substance that resists shrinking and is formulated mainly for use in filling in smaller holes and other imperfections in drywall or plastered walls. If the smoothness is questionable after a thorough inspection, give the wall a quick sanding with some 220-grit sandpaper once you fill in any dents and holes with spackling compound, then wipe it off with a microfiber cloth. This step is so important we’ll say it another way: Make sure your wall’s surface is nice and smooth from top to bottom and from one end to the other.

The smoother and more regular your wall feels before the dry-erase paint application, the more attractive it will look and the easier it will be to write on and erase after the coating cures. To achieve a perfectly smooth surface, besides filling in all holes, cuts, and cracks, you’ll also have to eliminate any raised areas on the surface, such as lumps and divots, no matter how small they may be. Thus, you can guarantee that all writing and drawing you do on the cured dry-erase coated wall will look clear and that you can write and erase without leaving any missed spots. So make sure your surface is as perfectly even as possible because after your base paint and dry-erase paint dry, you won’t want to have high and low areas where dry erase marker ink can collect in the low places. This will cause minute spots to appear on your dry-erase surface that will be hard to erase, thus compromising the surface’s condition and requiring sanding and a new application.

Your Wall Must Be Dry

Make sure that any fresh paint on the wall has dried for at least 24 hours before beginning to apply the premium dry-erase paint. For example, if you have recently applied a fresh coat of ReMARKable Tintable Base Paint to your wall, allow it to dry for a minimum of one day before installing the premium dry-erase coating. Waiting this period of time for the base paint to dry is essential to avoiding problems with your dry-erase paint application, such as bubbling, adverse chemical reactions, and poor adhesion of the topcoat to the base coat.

Another issue that results from applying the dry-erase paint over an insufficiently dry base coat is wrinkling, which results from solvents contained in the wet base paint underneath attacking the topcoat above as they try to pass through, causing the coating to wrinkle and look unsightly. Should this problem occur, you will need to let the wrinkled coating dry thoroughly and then sand the surface with 180- to 220-grit sandpaper, depending on how severe the wrinkling is. Next, a second layer of dry-erase paint should be applied, this time allowing the base paint to dry thoroughly before applying the topcoat.

Besides making sure that your base paint is completely dry, it’s essential to monitor the moisture on the wall and in the room before applying the premium dry-erase coating. This is a vitally important step because next to dust, moisture and humidity are the arch enemies of good adhesion for all types of paints and coatings. If you need to get your surface dry in a hurry, you can use fans or a dehumidifier to accelerate the process. And besides making the surface perfectly moisture-free, it’s important to check for dampness in the air where you’re applying the coating because excessively humid air will also cause the whiteboard coating to adhere poorly to your surface. If the humidity level is high in the room, open the windows and doors to let the air move around freely and, in this way, lower the moisture level before starting the coating application.

Your Wall Must Be Dust Free

If your wall has just a slight bit of texture, you can simply use 220-grit sandpaper to lightly sand the surface until it’s completely smooth. Then thoroughly wipe down the wall with a dampened microfiber cloth followed by a dry microfiber cloth, and you’ll be ready to begin your dry-erase paint application. Using a pole sander, also known as a drywall sander, will make the job of sanding go much more quickly. A drywall sander is a tool with a long handle and a wide sandpaper holder that’s used for sanding plastered walls, hard-to-reach ceilings, and textured walls and for removing bits of paper, dried paint, old coatings, adhesive residue, loose plaster, and the like from walls prior to painting or coating.

After sanding, remember that with all types of paints and coatings, dust is the greatest enemy of proper adhesion, so be extremely careful to remove all dust or debris such as hairs, lint, and wood splinters from your surface before starting to apply the top-quality dry-erase coating. Microfiber cloths or mitts are ideal to use for this purpose because microfiber materials are capable of removing dust and other types of debris on a microscopic level, and due to their exceptionally fine fibers, they leave behind no lint or dust after use. In fact, studies have shown that when fabrics made of microfiber material are used as cleaning tools, 99% of all the bacteria present on a surface are eliminated, and the material’s electrostatic properties give it an amazing capacity to attract and hold onto the tiniest of dirt and dust particles as well.

Dry Erase Walls